Beyond the Bench 24: Uniting for a Better Future

The Judicial Council’s Center for Families, Children and the Courts
The California Association of Collaborative Courts
announce:
Beyond the Bench 24: Uniting for a Better Future


Program at a Glance

This year Beyond the Bench includes a Collaborative Court track.  Five workshops of particular interest to Collaborative Court Professionals are offered.

Faculty, workshop summaries and learning objectives for the Collaborative Court Track are now available below.  Note that descriptions and objectives are not final and subject to change.

Lessons from Los Angeles’ 18 and Up Court: Navigating the NMD Process and Serving Transition Aged Youth

Date and Time:  Tuesday, December 19, 2017, Concurrent Workshop 1-F, 1:15p.m. – 2:45p.m.

Faculty:

  • The Honorable Margaret Henry, Los Angeles County Superior Court
  • Deborah Hale, Principal Deputy County Counsel, Los Angeles County Counsel’s Office
  • Jennifer Lorson, Supervising Attorney, Children’s Law Center of California (CLC)

Workshop Summary

According to the National Council of the Family and Juvenile Court Judges, transitioning out of foster care is especially challenging for young adults without a support system. These vulnerable young women and men disproportionately end up homeless, drug addicted and/or in the criminal justice system. The Los Angeles Superior Court 18 & Up Court–which has seen 2500 youth in its first year– handles the majority of cases for the 18 to 21 year-old youth in extended foster care by collaborating with government agencies, the innovative Peer Advocate Program, and community and service organizations to provide services to help young adults successfully transition out of foster care.

Learning Objectives

Workshop participants will:

  • Learn key components of Los Angeles 18 & Up Court and services available in the community to Non-minor Dependents (NMDs)
  • Discuss the effectiveness of the specialized “18 & Up Court”
  • Identify how NMDs are helped by extended foster care when cases are properly handled

Drug Courts: Where will We Be in 10 Years?

Date and Time:  Tuesday, December 19, 2017, Concurrent Workshop 2B, 3:00p.m. – 4:00p.m.

Faculty:

  • Judge Stephen Manley, Superior Court of California, County of Santa Clara, President, CA Association of Collaborative Courts
  • Carson Fox, Executive Director, National Association of Drug Court Professionals
  • Mack Jenkins, Chief Probation Officer (ret), San Diego County

Workshop Summary

Since their inception in l989, drug courts have evolved in a spectrum of judicially-supervised treatment programs that serve addiction, mental illness, post-traumatic stress disorder, co-occurring disorders, family issues, juvenile needs, homelessness and more. Nationally, a medical model approach is receiving more and more attention and prison reforms continue to be enacted.   In California, collaborative justice courts have received legislative support and have experienced changes as a result of the State’s voter initiative process.  Throughout this time period, collaborative courts have refined standards, established best practices and remained focused on outcomes that impact incarceration rates and crime statistics.

Learning Objectives

Workshop participants will:

  • Review a brief history of what has taken place during the past 28 years.
  • Identify the pressures and trends that influence decision making and resource availability for collaborative courts nationally and in California
  • Focus on the core value and importance of therapeutic jurisprudence and how it will continue to be a key instrument of positive outcomes for our identified populations during the next 10 years.
  • Develop strategies to prepare for the future.

Collaborative Court Self-Assessment: The Key to Survival

Date and Time:  Wednesday, December 20, 2017, Concurrent Workshop 3A, 9:15a.m. – 10:45a.m.

Faculty:

  • Phil Breitenbucher, Director of Family Drug Court Programs, Center for Children and Family Futures
  • Noreen Plumage, South Dakota Drug and DUI Court Liaison
  • Terrence Walton, National Association of Drug Court Professionals, Chief Operating Officer

Workshop Summary

This session will provide an overview of best practices and national standards and will provide practitioners an overview of the tools, technology (web-based) and structure needed to ensure positive outcomes using self-assessment tools.  These tools systematically look at program goals, challenges and successes.  This workshop will present a variety of self-assessment tools that address Juvenile Drug Courts, Family Dependency Drug Courts and Recovery-Oriented Drug Courts.

Each tool is unique and all contribute to identifying

  • current practices,
  • types of training and technical assistance needed to improve practices and technology transfer and
  • benchmark changes and outcomes through the use of data and evaluation

Training needs will be clarified among team members.  Valuable service system enhancements will become clearer.

Time will be focused on both the process of conducting self-assessments and on how to maximize the resulting information to increase program outcomes and to educate the community at large regarding collaborative justice court effectiveness.

Learning Objectives

Workshop participants will:

  • Recognize various self-assessment tools and peer review practices.
  • Tie the self-assessment process to nationally accepted Best Practice Standards and the Ten Key Components.
  • Garner information on how to use self-assessment tools to identify systems needs requiring attention.
  • Learn from collaborative court teams that have utilized self-assessment tools and the resulting outcomes.
  • Generate uses for self-assessment outcomes to communicate about collaborative court effectiveness with local elected officials and the general public
  • Develop strategies to implement use of self-assessment tools with their local collaborative court teams and strengthen local networks to support program participants.

Moving Towards Trauma Responsive Practice in Treatment Court Teams

Date and Time:  Wednesday, December 20, 2017, Concurrent Workshop 4G, 11:00a.m. – 12:30p.m

Faculty:

  • Kathleen West, Part Time Lecturer in Preventive Medicine, Institute for Health Promotion & Disease Prevention, University Southern California
  • Honorable Katherine Lucero, Santa Clara County Superior Court

Workshop Summary

The majority of children and families who come into court have traumatic experiences in their backgrounds and often experience ongoing trauma just by being in “the system”.  Prior traumatic experience impacts court users

Using an approach that takes traumatic experiences into account is the goal of this session.  Attendees will consider how court users (children, youth and their parents) are addressed; how family, dependency and juvenile courtrooms are managed; and how court teams ( e.g., psychologists, social workers, probation and parole officers) can effectively handle vicarious trauma. These tools will be tied to the importance for court settings that have the capacity to affect the intergenerational family.

This session will address what trauma-informed care and what would look like in practice in your courtrooms as you work with children, youth and parents.

Learning Objectives

Workshop participants will:

  • Identify what “counts” as traumatic exposures for children and youth and how it might explain some of their behaviors.
  • Explain why intergenerational trauma cycles are difficult to break and steps court teams (e.g., psychologists, social workers, probation and parole officers) can take to effectively intervene.
  • Identify at least three self-care strategies you can employ to improve your professional quality of life and model healthy trauma-informed practices for court users.

Hispanics and Latinos in Drug Courts: Cultural Strategies to Enhance and Sustain Recovery

Date and Time:  Wednesday, December 20, 2017, Concurrent Workshop 5B, 2:30p.m. – 4:00p.m.

Faculty:

  • The Honorable Rogelio Flores, Santa Barbara Superior Court

Workshop Summary

This session will provide a review of the scope of the problems that vary throughout states and how cultural humility principles can be integrated to work with participants’ cultural perspectives to support and sustain their recovery process.  To provide practitioners with culturally informed processes that can augment their skill sets and consequently outcomes for Hispanic and Latino drug court participants.

Learning Objectives

Workshop participants will:

  • Understand how Hispanic and Latino culture is layered within behavior
  • Identify major components of cultural humility as a process for practice
  • Explain effective strategies currently used in drug courts with Hispanic and Latino participants

 

Descriptions and objectives are not final and subject to change.